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Carnivorous Plant Genuses

Botanists currently recognize 18 groups of carnivorous plants that make up the 700+ species found throughout the world. Aldrovanda (Waterwheel) Brocchinia (Bromeliad) Byblis (Rainbow Plant) Catopsis (Bromeliad) Cephalotus (Australian Pitcher) Darlingtonia (Cobra Plant) Dionaea (Venus Flytrap) Drosera (Sundew) Drosophyllum (Dewy Pine) Genlisea (Corkscrew Plant) Heliamphora Nepenthes (Tropical Asian Pitcher) Philcoxia Pinguicula Roridula Sarracenia Triphyophyllum Utricularia The botanical names for these groups of plants are in italics. The common names are in parenthesis. Both names are used interchangeably among hobbyists, so...

Understanding Carnivorous Plants

The one thing that positively helped us become successful growing carnivorous plants was understanding that carnivorous plants are plants. They are not animals. They are not pets. They are not lizards sticking out of the ground that will rid your home of pesky flies forever. Carnivorous plants are plants. Animals are different from plants in how they acquire energy. Animals obtain energy by eating food, such as meats and vegetables. These foods contain proteins and starches, which are then transformed...

Carnivorous Plant Habitats

To most folks a freshwater bog or swamp seems to be very rich in nutrients, especially since mosses, ferns and orchids seem to thrive there. The rich black color of the soil suggests fertile conditions, but chemical analysis proves otherwise. The tea-colored waters are acidic and rich in tannic acid from abundant decomposing Sphagnum moss. This acidic condition, along with frequent water flow, quickly removes minerals from the soil. In warm weather, any remaining minerals are quickly consumed by bacterial...

The Venus Flytrap’s Seasonal Leaves

Venus flytraps tend to produce two types of leaves: spring-summer leaves and summer-autumn leaves. Before we describe the details, you need to know a little terminology. The trapping part of a leaf (the part that looks like a clam) is called the lamina or leaf-blade. The long leafy part that connects the lamina to the ground is called the leaf-base. (A third leaf part, the petiole, is the little post that connects the leaf base to the lamina. Some...

Official CarnivorousPlants.com Venus Flytrap Care Sheet, Part 1

Venus Flytrap care Sheet page 1 It is extremely important that the care sheet directions that come with your plant are strictly followed. If you have plans to grow your plant in a different way, or with a different soil or a different pot, or have read different care information online or in a book I strongly urge you not do this and to strictly follow the care sheet direction instead. I strongly recommend not using carnivorous plant soil purchased...

Official CarnivorousPlants.com Venus Flytrap Care Sheet, Part 2

Light: Venus Flytraps need strong light. They can be grown indoors next to a very sunny window where sunlight can visibly shine on the plant for 4 hours or more each day. The bottom center of a window is usually the brightest spot. THERE SHOULD BE NO SCREENING, closed or open blinds, tinting, a large tree, or an overhang on or in front of the window your VFT is receiving light through. The bottom center of a window is usually the...

Registered Venus Flytrap Cultivars

Over the past few decades, at least 3 dozen cultivars of the Venus flytrap have been created. The majority of these cultivars belong to the Dionaea group- these cultivars all have traps with tooth or triangular-like structures to capture prey. A good number of these cultivars can be found in nurseries and flower shops, but because of the demand for these plants, many remain sold out. At present, the registered cultivars include the following: Dionaea muscipula 'Akai Ryu' (Japanese...

How to Feed Your Venus Flytrap

There has been a fair amount of confusion among gardeners about Venus Flytrap feeding, and what is the proper way to make sure your plant gets the nutrition it needs.  But the answer to proper feeding of your Venus Flytrap may surprise you. First, before we discuss ways to feed your Venus Flytrap plant, let us first take a look at the native habitat of this fascinating plant, and what it can tell us about how the plant feeds itself. ...

All About the Venus Flytrap

Venus Flytraps are rather unique and unusual. They are unique in that they grow in soils and conditions that most plants would find difficult - wet, acidic soils with poor nutrients. Venus Flytraps are unusual in that they are able to live in poor nutrient soils by capturing and digesting insects, and using the nutrients from insects to make up for the poor soils. There are many varieties of insect eating or carnivorous plants in the world. But most of the...

Growing Venus Flytraps From Seeds

Growing a Venus Flytrap from Venus Flytrap seeds is not for the beginner. Although many North American plants can be easily grown and cultivated from seeds, the Venus Flytrap plant is a little more difficult. The Venus Flytrap produces a small white flower in the spring, typically in April through May. The flower produces small seeds that can be used to grow new Venus Flytrap plants. So Venus Flytrap seeds are usually available at pretty good prices in June and July. Remember...