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Official CarnivorousPlants.com Venus Flytrap Care Sheet, Part 1

Venus Flytrap care Sheet page 1 It is extremely important that the care sheet directions that come with your plant are strictly followed. If you have plans to grow your plant in a different way, or with a different soil or a different pot, or have read different care information online or in a book I strongly urge you not do this and to strictly follow the care sheet direction instead. I strongly recommend not using carnivorous plant soil purchased...

Official CarnivorousPlants.com Venus Flytrap Care Sheet, Part 2

Light: Venus Flytraps need strong light. They can be grown indoors next to a very sunny window where sunlight can visibly shine on the plant for 4 hours or more each day. The bottom center of a window is usually the brightest spot. THERE SHOULD BE NO SCREENING, closed or open blinds, tinting, a large tree, or an overhang on or in front of the window your VFT is receiving light through. The bottom center of a window is usually the...

Registered Venus Flytrap Cultivars

Over the past few decades, at least 3 dozen cultivars of the Venus flytrap have been created. The majority of these cultivars belong to the Dionaea group- these cultivars all have traps with tooth or triangular-like structures to capture prey. A good number of these cultivars can be found in nurseries and flower shops, but because of the demand for these plants, many remain sold out. At present, the registered cultivars include the following: Dionaea muscipula 'Akai Ryu' (Japanese...

How to Feed Your Venus Flytrap

There has been a fair amount of confusion among gardeners about Venus Flytrap feeding, and what is the proper way to make sure your plant gets the nutrition it needs.  But the answer to proper feeding of your Venus Flytrap may surprise you. First, before we discuss ways to feed your Venus Flytrap plant, let us first take a look at the native habitat of this fascinating plant, and what it can tell us about how the plant feeds itself. ...

All About the Venus Flytrap

Venus Flytraps are rather unique and unusual. They are unique in that they grow in soils and conditions that most plants would find difficult - wet, acidic soils with poor nutrients. Venus Flytraps are unusual in that they are able to live in poor nutrient soils by capturing and digesting insects, and using the nutrients from insects to make up for the poor soils. There are many varieties of insect eating or carnivorous plants in the world. But most of the...

Growing Venus Flytraps From Seeds

Growing a Venus Flytrap from Venus Flytrap seeds is not for the beginner. Although many North American plants can be easily grown and cultivated from seeds, the Venus Flytrap plant is a little more difficult. The Venus Flytrap produces a small white flower in the spring, typically in April through May. The flower produces small seeds that can be used to grow new Venus Flytrap plants. So Venus Flytrap seeds are usually available at pretty good prices in June and July. Remember...

Venus Flytrap Care

Venus flytraps are not hard to care for. Venus flytrap care is really easy, as long as you don't over complicate it. And as long as you pay attention to a few "do's" and "don'ts". Your Venus Flytrap is just like your other potted house plants - it needs the right kind of soil, lots of light, and water. But the conditions that Venus Flytraps really like is a little different than your average house plant. If you bought a small...

Venus Flytrap Fun Facts

There are several strange but true Venus Flytrap facts that are worth telling. The Venus Flytrap plant, unlike most plants, actively seeks insects, not to pollinate, but to feed on! You see, Venus Flytrap plants grow in soils that are poor in nutrients. And Venus Flytraps catch insects and digest them for the nutrients that they cannot get from soil. Here are a few interesting facts about Venus Flytraps: Venus Flytrap plants are not tropical plants. Venus Flytrap plants are native to North...

The Venus Flytrap’s Native Habitat

The Venus Flytrap habitat, contrary to popular opinion, is decidedly not tropical. Yes, the native plants are subject to hot and humid weather, but as the folks in the coastal regions of South and North Carolina can attest to, they also get some very cool weather in the winter, including the occasional freezing temperatures and snowfall. Venus Flytrap native habitat is located in USDA Hardiness Zone 8b, with an average annual minimum temperature of 10 to 15 degrees F (-9.5...